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Online Hypnosis Training

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  • Last Update January 4, 2019

Description

What Is Hypnotherapy?

Hypnotherapy is a guided hypnosis or a trance-like state of focus and concentration achieved with the help of a clinical hypnotherapist. This trance-like state is similar to being completely absorbed in a book, movie, music, or even one’s own thoughts or meditations. In this state, clients can turn their attention completely inward to find and utilize the natural resources deep within themselves that can help them make changes or regain control in certain areas of their life.

When It’s Used

Since hypnotherapy is an adjunct form of therapy, used along with other forms of psychological or medical treatment, there are many applications. Hypnotherapy can be used to treat anxiety, phobias, substance abuse including tobacco, sexual dysfunction, undesirable spontaneous behaviors, and bad habits. It can be used to help improve sleep, learning disorders, communication, and relationship issues. Hypnotherapy can aid in pain management and help resolve medical conditions such as digestive disorders, skin issues, and gastrointestinal side effects of pregnancy and chemotherapy. It can also be used by dentists to help patients control their fears or to treat teeth grinding and other oral conditions.

What to Expect

Although there are different techniques, clinical hypnotherapy is generally performed in a calm, therapeutic environment. The therapist will guide you into a relaxed, focused state and ask you to think about experiences and situations in positive ways that can help you change the way you think and behave. Unlike some dramatic portrayals of hypnosis in movies, books, or on stage, you will not be unconscious, asleep, or in any way out of control of yourself. You will hear the therapist’s suggestions, but it is up to you to decide whether or not to act on them.

How It Works

Hypnosis is not a psychotherapeutic treatment or a form of psychotherapy, but rather a tool or procedure that helps facilitate various types of therapies and medical or psychological treatments. Only trained health care providers certified in clinical hypnosis can decide, with their patient, if hypnosis should be used along with other treatments. As with psychotherapy, the length of hypnosis treatment varies, depending on the complexity of the problem.

What to Look for in a Hypnotherapist

Look for a hypnotherapist who is a member of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH) or the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. To be a member of either of these organizations, a hypnotherapist must have a doctorate level degree in medicine, dentistry, or psychology, or a master’s degree in nursing, social work, psychology, or marital/family therapy plus a specific number of hours of approved training in hypnotherapy. In some cases, accredited, doctoral-level practitioners of alternative health care, such as traditional Chinese medicine, may also be approved for membership. Of course, in addition to looking at qualifications, you should also find a hypnotherapist with whom you feel confident and comfortable in a therapeutic relationship.

What to Learn in this course

You are about to delve into the art of hypnosis, surveying the techniques of several masters,  from Milton Erickson’s indirect, permissive style to the direct, authoritarian style of George Estabrooks.  The power of all these techniques lies in the connection that you build with the Unconscious Mind your own and your client’s. The secrets and benefits of hypnosis lie in the trance state,  and we will highlight the ability to produce deep trance phenomena. Your ability to move from the state you are in right now to deep trance depends on the rapport you have with your Unconscious Mind.  This Training focuses on teaching you how to work at deeper levels with your own Unconscious Mind and with the Unconscious Mind of each of your clients.

What are real-life application

Since hypnotherapy is an adjunct form of therapy, used along with other forms of psychological or medical treatment, there are many applications. Hypnotherapy can be used to treat anxiety, phobias, substance abuse including tobacco, sexual dysfunction, undesirable spontaneous behaviors, and bad habits. It can be used to help improve sleep, learning disorders, communication, and relationship issues. Hypnotherapy can aid in pain management and help resolve medical conditions such as digestive disorders, skin issues, and gastrointestinal side effects of pregnancy and chemotherapy. It can also be used by dentists to help patients control their fears or to treat teeth grinding and other oral conditions.

Hypnosis can help people with mental dependencies, disorders, and psychological problems.

Some common uses include but are not limited to:

  • Weight loss
  • Addiction
  • Relationships
  • OCD
  • Phobias
  • Anxiety
  • Pain Management
  • Habit Control

Thanks for your interest in UR Best Online Learning, We are committed to delivering the best knowledge for you to use in your business and with clients.

 

Topics for this course

89 Lessons

Tutor Topics

What is Real?
Introduction – The Mind-Body Connection
The Connection Between the Unconscious and Body
Why do we Want to Learn Hypnosis?
History of Hypnisis
More History
Experience the Trance
Trance and Rapport
Experiencing Trance
Stage Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy
Trance and Learning
Milton Model Patterns of Hypnotic Language
Utilization Exercise
Client’s Personal History
Using the Meta Model
Suggestibility Tests
Addressing Misconceptions
Helping the Client Understand Trance and its Benefits
Suggestibility Tests
Suggestibility Test Exercise for Two People
Suggestibility Tests as Convincers
Stages of Hypnosis
Recognizing Levels of Trance
Table: Stages of Hypnosis
Applicability of the Stages of Hypnosis
Ericksonian Method
The Usefulness of Erickson’s Techniques
Erickson’s Utilization Approach
Steps in Trance Work
Erickson’s Hypnotic Patterns of Indirect Suggestion
Evaluation of Results
Two Ericksonian Induction
Ericksonian Induction No. 1: Question Set Induction
Physiological Responses to Trance
Ericksonian Induction No. 2: Arm Levitation
Ericksonian Interventions
The pendulum and Other Ideomotor Signals
When to Use a Pendulum
How to Use a Pendulum
Additional Notes on use of the Pendulum
Other Ideomotor Signals
Metaphors
Multiple Embedded Metaphors
A Practical Exercise in Creating Metaphors
Refining Your Style for Working with Metaphors
Progressive Test Induction Based on Estabrooks
Progressive Test Induction Adapted from Estabrooks
Further Notes on Progressive Test Induction
Deepening Techniques
Deepening Techniques
Live Demonstration of Deepening Techniques
Post Hypnosis Suggestion
Techniques for Making Post-Hypnotic Suggestions
Elman Method
Elman’s Stages of Hypnosis
Conditions for Hypnosis, and Pre-Talk
Elman Induction No. 1
Elman Induction No. 2
Developing your induction Style
Conclusion
When Not to Use Hypnosis
Continuous Learning
Appendix
Guidelines for Writing Your Personal Biography
Personal Brochure Uses
AIDS Session 1
AIDS Session 2
Alcohol
Hypnotic Scripts
Alcohol Session I
Alcohol Session II
Alcohol Session III
Alcohol Session IV
Anger/Temper
Angina Pectoris
Asthma
Depression: That Was Yesterday
Depression II
Depression I
Creating
Concentration
Confidence
Confidence 1
Deep Relaxation Induction
Stage Induction
Fractional Relaxation
Clasp Induction
Staircase Relaxation
Hand Yardstick Test
Hypnosis Certificaton Test
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